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How to Implement Effective Global Content Marketing [Book Review]

How to Implement Effective Global Content Marketing [Book Review]

Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Category:  Book Reviews  B2B Sales  Content Marketing  

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Global Content Marketing Book Review

In my corporate marketing days, I often worked with  our overseas marketing teams on product launches and marketing campaigns. The most complex part, in my opinion, wasn’t really content creation - it was implementing processes that were easy for everyone to understand and follow.  

 

With good processes in place, everyone has appropriate expectations and understands who’s doing what by when.  This is critical when you’re working across multiple time zones with different countries.  But creating these processes can be a challenge, especially if you’re new to your role or your company is just starting to build an international marketing team. 

Former Intel Global Marketing Expert Shares Her Advice

Fortunately, Pam Didner has a lot of experience in that area, and she’s generously sharing it with us in her new book, Global Content Marketing.  Pam has the pedigree to prove it – she led Intel’s enterprise product launches and worldwide marketing campaigns so she knows a more than a thing or two about how to engineer a successful cross-functional, team approach to developing global content. 

In a fresh take on the classic 4 P’s, Pam creates a new set of “P’s” for global content creation: plan, produce, promote, and perfect, and gives us steps for each when developing engaging content for global audiences. 

Who’s Really in Charge: The Regions or Headquarters?

One of the biggest challenges in global marketing is figuring out who really is in charge.  Is it the regions, who have the eyes and ears of their local market and know it best?  Or is it headquarters, where the budget usually lives and corporate messaging and branding originate? 

Pam has walked this tenuous path so she describes different options for handling it and creating a centralized vs. decentralized structure. This information alone is a very worthwhile reason to read the book as it takes a lot of experience, or a wise mentor, to learn how to best handle this situation without ruffling feathers, alienating colleagues, and missing deadlines.

Headquarter’s Role is to Lead and Serve

Pam’s philosophy is that headquarter’s role is to lead and serve.  On a granular level, this means headquarters provides guidance so geographies can execute with a certain level of autonomy. When she ran global launches at Intel, she saw herself as a support person to her geographical counterparts. That philosophy meant she was always able to find a solution with her colleagues no matter how confrontational a situation might have been. 

In addition to these helpful guidelines, you’ll find case studies with more detailed examples.  One of my favorites was a detailed description of Intel’s annual planning process.  You might find gems here that you can apply to your own corporate plan to make the process more streamlined and inclusive.

The key takeaway: if you’re responsible for global content marketing, get this book.  Where else will you find detailed information on such an important, but niche, function?  You’ll save yourself time and headaches if you read Global Content Marketing and follow Pam’s advice.

Comments

How does your company handle global content creation?  Do you use a centralized or decentralized structure?  Do you have war stories or tips to pass on?

 

 

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